“Ancient Expanse” is a site-specific installation I started in Denmark in 2009 as a resident artist at the International Ceramic Research Center-Guldagergaard. It consists of a series of small ceramic pieces that are a reaction to the natural environment along the southwestern coast of Zealand. I documented the piece by taking pictures of the sculptures along the beach of the town where I was living in the water and other natural areas.

“Ancient Expanse” explores the boundaries between perception, reality, time and space. Photographs of the work document a fleeting moment in time where the natural and the created interact. Over the past five years, I have continued to make more pieces and have accumulated over 1,000 ceramic objects. They are installed into large organic patterns in galleries or outdoors, and the original photographs are shown via video or projection. While the piece was inspired by Denmark, the colors and patterns of the individual sculptures reference ocean life as well as textures found in nature.

“Ancient Expanse” causes the viewer to stop and think about what they are seeing. There is an element of surprise as people realize that they are not actually looking at real objects, but sculptural forms that reference nature. It blends the natural with an element of discovery that engages the community in a dialogue about perception and reality.